Sons of Georgia is a film by Children of Light Productions that tells the story of one family during the War Between the States.  The message, as spelled out by 'Lester' to his brother 'Sam' is very timely.  Freedom is not free; sacrifice is necessary to preserve our principles.

Told from the perspective of the youngest son as written to his grandson, it really is the story of the third son overcoming his fear and uncertainty. It is the coming of age story of Sam Blanding during the days of Sherman's "March to the Sea".
The Worldview: This film was made by Reformed Christian young people. The worldview can be summed up by saying: God is sovereign.

The Production Values: I will be quite honest, the production values are not industry standard, but I have seen worse in Independent Christain films. There were a few scenes where they used visual effects...for instance, one character get's his leg slashed with a saber. The editor created a 'blood spatter', which in my opinion was unrealistic looking. I wouldn't have noticed if he had not put it in there. (I would have shot that scene a tad different--it could have been more effective.)

Overall the camera work was pretty good (better than anything I could so--particularly at the stage of the game I am at! )

The music is good. Some of it was composed by Gabriel Hudelson. I recognized it partly because I'd heard it before--but I think I would have anyway. Gabriel's music is rather distinctive. I really like it.

Costumes: Some were better than others, but if you didn't know any better  you wouldn't notice that this lad and that had on modern button up shirts. They could have taken better care with the ladies hair. Women always parted their hair down the middle--several girls have it parted on the side. (Just a minor quibble--but I thought I would mention it.)

The Acting: Much better than 'Sybil Ludington'. There were a few times when the actors could have been more passionate. I think they would have been if they hadn't been concentrating on their Georgia accents...it is my opinion that if you can't hold an accent you are better off not attempting it at all. To me, it is much more distracting (and thereby detracting from the movie) to listen to bad/in and out accents then it is if the actors don't try.  On a more positive note--the tears/crying were pretty convincing. Overall, the acting was great for an independent film. My personal opinion is that if young Samuel Saffa keeps acting, he could make a very fine actor.  He's pretty good.
I won my copy of Sons of Georgia in a giveaway hosted by A Window Into My World (thank-you, Allison!!)  I was so very excited to get it and I wasn't disappointed with it, even with the one or two places where it drug just a bit. Overall the story was pretty good, the acting was good, the message was good. I highly recommend this film for two reasons: 1. It is wholesome material for families to view; 2. We have to support our young independent filmmakers. Even though their films may not be industry standard, how can we expect them to make more--and reach industry standards-- without our support?

Rating: A 5 for worldview; a 4 for independent films. Keep it up guys!

        Racheal

 
 
We watched this movie last night for the first time. I have wanted to see it ever since it came out and even more so since my darling friend gave it to me for Christmas. I thought it was great!

The story is about fire-fighter Caleb Holt and his wife, Katherine. They have a crumbling relationship that is getting explosive. (Kirk Cameron throws a hissy fit with ease.) Caleb is a good firefighter who longs for 'respect' from his wife; but his actions often do not call for respect. Both parties in this marriage are in the wrong (Katherine is letting another man beguile her). Both are selfish, which causes great friction and discontent.

The side story is Katherine's great love for her parents and her desire to get her incapacitated mother new and better medical supplies. This aspect is cleaverly drawn into and helps decide the outcome of the film.

Caleb complains to his dad, who challenges him hold off on divorce for 40 days--to take the 'Love Dare'. Caleb agrees, more to please his dad (a Christian) than anything really--he does want to save his marriage, but for all the wrong reasons. Halfway through the 'Love Dare', which up to this point had been performed obligatorily, Caleb comes to see his sin, his fallenness, and his need for redemption. (I thought this scene well done and not too preachy nor sappy.) With his new understanding of love and what it really is, Caleb sets his face to defeat his selfishness and win back the heart of his wife. She continues to rebuff him.

I won't say how exactly it ends...other than there is eventual reconciliation and the ending is a beautiful picture of forgiveness and peace within.

This is a movie with very serious themes. They are handled with due seriousness. However, at the same time, there are moments of laugh out loud humor. Two side characters in particular provide comic relief to ease the rage and sorrow.  For an indie movie the acting is supurb (of course, if I remember correctly, Kirk Cameron is a professional actor.)

As just a insignifanct side note...I noticed that several times throughout the movie, there was the same piece of music that was in 'Facing the Giants'. Its a piece of music with a hymn (which I cannot remember the name of!) worked into it. It must be Sherwood Pictures theme music or some :)

        Racheal

5-Star